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of dallas, houston, san netanya, atlanta, charlotte, and south carolina ever -- were republican. analyzing by saying suburbs does not work. you have to look at each individual suburb or the region of the country. and we have to rethink the way we spend money in politics. if this was a $6 billion election-year with status quo results, the biggest success would -- when it comes to money and politics and i'm not talking about message macro, it may be an effective way to pay voters directly. there is more returns for your investment. i would conclude by saying that the supreme court is the second most important institution in the united states in aiding the economic recovery because next to the feds, they have done more to pump more money, more stimulus into the economy in hard-hit states like nevada, florida, ohio, colorado, any institution. they may be more important than the fed. we have to look at money and politics. >> this is interesting. the comments from all four speakers. i want to ask about a demographic group that none of you touched on. one out of every five americans has a disabil
swing. suburbs of dallas, houston, san netanya, atlanta, charlotte, and south carolina ever -- were republican. analyzing by saying suburbs does not work. you have to look at each individual suburb or the region of the country. and we have to rethink the way we spend money in politics. if this was a $6 billion election-year with status quo results, the biggest success would -- when it comes to money and politics and i'm not talking about message should dismiss des -- macro, it may be an effective way to pay voters directly. should dismiss demographics -- independence because they leaned democratic. the suburbs cannot be analyzed as a whole. you look nationally, romney won the suburbs by two points. look at northern virginia. it delivered -- the blue state suburbs, philadelphia whiteout romney. the suburbs also wiped out romney. new york, philadelphia, d.c., los angeles, san francisco, the suburbs were democratic. the suburbs were swing. suburbs of dallas, houston, san netanya, atlanta, charlotte, and south carolina ever -- were republican. analyzing by saying suburbs does not work.
and their recovery. let's go to james in dallas, texas. caller: good morning. the answer to your question. it is very difficult to have a lot of confidence in the security team regardless of what happened in benghazi. the president could have come out and given the public the truth. a lot of callers will call in and say people do not like barack obama because of his skin color. i voted for barack obama in 2000 because of his skin color. i wanted this country to get passed a landmark issue of electing a african-american for president. one of your earlier callers mentioned the daywear the target. i see no reason why this administration did not take action. if they did not take action because they did not know what was happening, i think there is evidence they did know what was happening, it is unforgivable. if they did not know what was going on, that is even more inexcusable. host: manhattan, kansas. dave is an independent caller. caller: i just wanted to say the foreign policy of obama is a spitting image of bush. we have droned more pakistan as than bush under obama. it is only creating more terrori
industrial complex? what happened in dallas? the assassination of john f. kennedy, sunday at 7:30 p.m. eastern and pacific. >> democratic and republican congressional leaders are voicing optimism about avoiding tax increases and automatic spending cuts in january, the so-called fiscal cliff. leaders from both the house and senate met with president obama this morning at the white house, their first discussion in negotiation on the fiscal cliff. the president started the day with comments to reporters. >> i want to welcome the congressional leadership here and thank them for their time. i think we're all aware that we have some urgent business to do and we got to make sure that taxes don't go up on middle class families, that our economy will remain strong, that we're creating jobs and that is an agenda that democrats and republicans and independents, people all across the country share. so our challenge is to make sure that we are able to cooperate together, work together, find some common ground, make some tough compromises, build some consensus to do the people's business and what
in dallas? the assassination of john f. kennedy, sunday. >> "washington journal" continues. host: and as law makers return to the lame discussion legislative session, congress and the white house are beginning negotiations today on how to avoid the so-called fiscal cliff to discuss this issue. we're joined by wisconsin republican senator ron johnson. senator johnson, we've now heard president obama repeatedly insist that any deal that's reached has to include higher taxes on the wealthiest americans. is that something you see republicans being able to agree to? guest: i think republicans are all about increasing revenue of the federal combovement. but our concept is let's increase revenue the old fashioned way by growing our economy because it's far more effective. if we increase marginal tax rates on higher income individuals, you really are beginning to tax smaller, medium sized businesses. i had one of those businesses for 31 years. i understand how it is. if you your marginal tack rates are 40%, which is kind of where it is today. you've got 60 cents of every dollar available to reinvest
running into the convention. the front page of the "dallas morning news," or the "fort worth star-telegram," "g.o.p. shifts on immigration." the dallas morning news -- it was amaze together see, that, wow, we're going to come in here and label them as antianything, and it was a total different route. then some people came to me and some friends of mine said we've got to take this to the national level. we went to the national platform in tampa and started talking about it. we got a national guest worker endorsement on the national republican platform, which was great. thought my work was over. election day hits and wednesday my phone starts getting blown up again. it's time to get back in the debate again. we need to start doing more, we need to start talking about this. you know, i believe free-market solutions are a part of this. i believe in strong border security. the anti-immigration groups will try to label us as open borders, big business wants cheap labor. i can tell you, if we can fund blackwater security forces in iraq or some type of security force that is licensed and
: this is the first allegation i have heard of that. host: but go to dallas, texas, independent line. caller: is there a historical comparison to suppression. third-party votes as there is today? guest: i do not know what you mean about a suppression of the third-party voices. there have been the third party boys over there. for example, the debates, back when they were run by the league of women voters and now the league -- the debate commission. ross perot felt when he did not meet a certain threshold in the polls that he was not invited into the debates. there are any number of complaints that have been made over the years. it is tough for third-party to get on the ballot. let's be honest. the two major parties are aggressive in perpetuating themselves and they are not interested in fostering strong challengers. host: the history of money in campaigning. guest: it is a perennial issue. i hate to say that it is evergreen, but iwaith us. going back to 1996, that was an interesting election. -- 1896, he was very much the candidate of industry, business. william jennings bryan, a populist fro
. he spoke to supporters in dallas that year. >> wait just a minute. the first thing we want to do, we will be talking about this in a minute. the first thing we want to do is to team up together and make it work now, right? absolutely. you are not too happy, we can make some changes in 1994, right? the main thing now, time is precious. let's try to make it work. texas working together to make it work. i will be talking about that in a minute. we have worked to starting right away. our country needs all of our help. [applause] i want to thank all of you are here tonight and all the people who have come here together across the nation. starting last february, you did something that everybody said could not be done. millions of you came together to take your country back. [applause] you gave washington a laser-like message to listen to the people. [applause] you have done an incredible job of getting this country turned back around to the country that our founders established, a country that came from the people and you have changed the country to your massive efforts. i compliment you f
response. guest: this is the first allegation i have heard of that. host: but go to dallas, texas, independent line. caller: is there a historical comparison to suppression. third-party votes as there is today? guest: i do not know what you mean about a suppression of the third-party voices. there have been the third party boys over there. for example, the debates, back when they were run by the league of women voters and now the debate commission. ross perot felt when he did not meet a certain threshold in the polls that he was not invited into the debates. there are any number of complaints that have been made over the years. it is tough for third-party to get on the ballot. let's be honest. the two major parties are aggressive in perpetuating themselves and they are not interested in fostering strong challengers. host: the history of money in campaigning. guest: it is a perennial issue. i hate to say that it is evergreen, but it has always been with us. going back to 1876, that was an interesting election. he was very much the candidate of industry, business. william jennings b
am retired, but i was a plant worker. host: where is marshalled? caller: 150 miles east of dallas. host: thank you for calling. as greta mentioned, the same-sex marriage issue passed in the state of maryland, and along with that the first openly gay member of the u.s. senate was elected in wisconsin. here is tammy baldwin. [video clip] >> i did not run to make history. i ran to make a difference. [applause] a difference in the lives of families struggling to find work and pay the bills, a difference in the lives of students worried about debt. [applause] and seniors, worried about their retirement security. [applause] a difference in the lives of veterans who fought for us and need someone fighting for them and their families. [applause] a difference in the lives of entrepreneur weres -- entrepreneurs try to build a business and economic security. [applause] but in choosing me to tackle those challenges, the people of wisconsin have made history. [applause] host: this tweet from benjamin netanyahu, the prime minister of israel, who congratulates u.s. president barack obama on his
in dallas? global security leaders gathered in nova scotia to discuss pressing security and defense issues. the summit is addressing server security, modern warfare, syria, and china. this panel looks at the global perception of leadership in the world and advancement of military technology. this is just over one hour. >> ladies and gentlemen, welcome. i am the editor of foreign affairs. it is a privilege and honor and pleasure to be here at the halifax form. foreign affairs is in the business of serious discussion of important issues and questions. that is the same business halifax is in. we are delighted to be a sponsor. it will be a fantastic weekend. let me cut to the chase. we have a fantastic panel and topic and limited time. let's get right to it. david sanger, paula dobriansky, now at harvard, wolfgang ischinger, the head of the munich security conference. we have a great group. the point of this session is to do big thinking on the major trends that will set up other discussions for the weekend. the title is, what is the new normal and when will it get here? had halifax existed 15
happened in dallas? the assassination of john f. kennedy sunday at 7:30 p.m. eastern and pacific. >> more now on the congressional investigation into the meningitis outbreak from today's "washington journal" and is about 35 minutes. host: joining us now is anna edney, who reports on the fda and other issues for bloomberg news. this issue stemmed from what is known as a compound in pharmacy. can you give us a history of what this is about? guest: they are looking to see if this could have been prevented. the pharmacy has been around since 1998, 1999, and there have been complaints from other states, basically since about a year from when it started. lawmakers were trying to figure out if more could have been done in the state of massachusetts, or if the food and drug administration could have been investigating it more apparent maybe it could have or should have been -- more. maybe it could have or should have been shut down. they are asking the massachusetts officials and the food and drug administration whether they were doing enough. the question is whether they were doing compounding,
Search Results 0 to 11 of about 12